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Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive Heart Failure

August 2, 2016 @ 1:12 pm
by Heart News 247

Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive heart failure is sometimes simply called “heart failure”. It is the leading cause of hospitalization in people over 65 affecting about 670,000 Americans annually. Currently nearly 6 million persons in the United States have a diagnosis of heart failure.

Heart failure doesn’t mean that the heart has “stopped” working, but, that its pumping ability is weaker than normal. With heart failure, the pressure in the heart increases because the blood moves through the heart and body at a slower rate. As this happens the chambers of the heart may slowly change by stretching to hold more blood to pump through the body or by becoming stiff and thickened. This helps to keep the blood moving for a while, but eventually the heart muscle walls become weakened and then unable to pump efficiently. The next thing that usually happens is the kidneys respond by causing the body to retain fluid (water) and salt. The body becomes congested as this fluid builds up in the arms, legs, ankles, feet, lungs, or other organs. This condition is described now as “congestive heart failure”.

Congestive Heart Failure (CHF), is a usually a chronic illness that affects the chambers of the heart. There are four chambers in the heart. The upper half of the heart is known as the atria which is divided into 2 sides, the left and the right side, and the other lower half is the left and right ventricles. A healthy normal heart is a strong, muscular pump somewhat bigger than a clenched hand. It pumps blood continuously through the circulatory system. The right atria takes in deoxygenated blood from the systemic circulation and sends it back out to the lungs through the right ventricles where the blood gets to be oxygenated. Oxygenated blood leaves the lungs, travels to the left atrium, then on to the left ventricles, which pumps it to the systemic circulation to provide oxygen and nutrient rich blood to the different organs and tissues. The heart pumps blood to the lungs and to all the body’s different organs and tissues by a sequence of highly organized contractions of the four chambers. For the heart to function properly, the four chambers must beat in an organized way.

With heart failure, the heart muscles becomes weak for various reasons, making the heart slowly lose the capacity to pump enough blood throughout the body to meet the body’s demand of oxygen and nutrients. As the heart’s pumping turns out to be less effective, blood may back up into different zones of the body. Fluid may build up in the lungs, liver, gastrointestinal tract, and the arms and legs. Thus, it is called Congestive Heart Failure (CHF).

There are two fundamental issues in congestive heart failure:
Systolic dysfunction – when the heart can’t pump enough blood supply to meet the body’s demand.
Diastolic dysfunction – when the heart cannot accept all the blood being sent in.

Sadly, many people suffer with both systolic and diastolic heart failure.

Causes:
CHF is often a chronic condition, yet it may come on all of a sudden. It can be brought about by various heart problems. The condition may affect just the right side or just the left half of the heart. But more often, both sides of the heart are involved.

The most common causes of CHF are:
Coronary artery disease (CAD) – a condition wherein cholesterol and other types of fatty substances blocks or narrows the arteries that supply the heart with blood. This can weaken the heart muscle over time or suddenly.
High blood pressure – persistent/not well controlled/untreated hypertension forces the heart to pump against higher pressure, causing the heart muscles to weaken over time.

Less common causes:
Heart valves disease – heart valves that are not properly working by being too narrow or leaky
Endocarditis or myocarditis – infection causing inflammation of the heart muscles
Arrhythmias
Heart attack
Excessive use of alcohol or drugs
Diabetes
Being obese or overweight
High blood cholesterol
Heart muscle disease of unknown cause
Kidney conditions that increases blood pressure and fluid buildup
Other medical conditions such as thyroid diseases or anemia

Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive heart failure is sometimes simply called “heart failure”. It is the leading cause of hospitalization in people over 65 affecting about 670,000 Americans annually. Currently nearly 6 million persons in the United States have a diagnosis of heart failure.

Heart failure doesn’t mean that the heart has “stopped” working, but, that its pumping ability is weaker than normal. With heart failure, the pressure in the heart increases because the blood moves through the heart and body at a slower rate. As this happens the chambers of the heart may slowly change by stretching to hold more blood to pump through the body or by becoming stiff and thickened. This helps to keep the blood moving for a while, but eventually the heart muscle walls become weakened and then unable to pump efficiently. The next thing that usually happens is the kidneys respond by causing the body to retain fluid (water) and salt. The body becomes congested as this fluid builds up in the arms, legs, ankles, feet, lungs, or other organs. This condition is described now as “congestive heart failure”.

Congestive Heart Failure (CHF), is a usually a chronic illness that affects the chambers of the heart. There are four chambers in the heart. The upper half of the heart is known as the atria which is divided into 2 sides, the left and the right side, and the other lower half is the left and right ventricles. A healthy normal heart is a strong, muscular pump somewhat bigger than a clenched hand. It pumps blood continuously through the circulatory system. The right atria takes in deoxygenated blood from the systemic circulation and sends it back out to the lungs through the right ventricles where the blood gets to be oxygenated. Oxygenated blood leaves the lungs, travels to the left atrium, then on to the left ventricles, which pumps it to the systemic circulation to provide oxygen and nutrient rich blood to the different organs and tissues. The heart pumps blood to the lungs and to all the body’s different organs and tissues by a sequence of highly organized contractions of the four chambers. For the heart to function properly, the four chambers must beat in an organized way.

With heart failure, the heart muscles becomes weak for various reasons, making the heart slowly lose the capacity to pump enough blood throughout the body to meet the body’s demand of oxygen and nutrients. As the heart’s pumping turns out to be less effective, blood may back up into different zones of the body. Fluid may build up in the lungs, liver, gastrointestinal tract, and the arms and legs. Thus, it is called Congestive Heart Failure (CHF).

There are two fundamental issues in congestive heart failure:
Systolic dysfunction – when the heart can’t pump enough blood supply to meet the body’s demand.
Diastolic dysfunction – when the heart cannot accept all the blood being sent in.

Sadly, many people suffer with both systolic and diastolic heart failure.



Causes:
CHF is often a chronic condition, yet it may come on all of a sudden. It can be brought about by various heart problems. The condition may affect just the right side or just the left half of the heart. But more often, both sides of the heart are involved.

The most common causes of CHF are:
Coronary artery disease (CAD) – a condition wherein cholesterol and other types of fatty substances blocks or narrows the arteries that supply the heart with blood. This can weaken the heart muscle over time or suddenly.
High blood pressure – persistent/not well controlled/untreated hypertension forces the heart to pump against higher pressure, causing the heart muscles to weaken over time.

Less common causes:
Heart valves disease – heart valves that are not properly working by being too narrow or leaky
Endocarditis or myocarditis – infection causing inflammation of the heart muscles
Arrhythmias
Heart attack
Excessive use of alcohol or drugs
Diabetes
Being obese or overweight
High blood cholesterol
Heart muscle disease of unknown cause
Kidney conditions that increases blood pressure and fluid buildup
Other medical conditions such as thyroid diseases or anemia

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Comments

  • Russo Simon (R)
    November 2, 2015

    “T” is missing in “Heart”
    God bless!

    • EmpoweRN
      November 2, 2015

      +Russo Simon (R)
      Hi Russo! Oops!! Thank you for letting me know!!
      See you soon!
      – Caroline

    • Russo Simon (R)
      November 2, 2015

      +EmpoweRN You’re welcome!

    • EmpoweRN
      November 4, 2015

      +Russo Simon (R)
      🙂

  • Audrey U
    November 2, 2015

    Hi, last week we learned this and my professor said that we should no
    longer call it “congestive”, and that CHF now refers to chronic heart
    failure.. just wondering if you knew if this was accurate or not?

  • Nurse Bass
    November 2, 2015

    Love it! Very thorough

    • EmpoweRN
      November 4, 2015

      +Nurse Bass
      Thanks so much for letting me know!!
      xoxo
      – Caroline

  • congestive heart failure diseases
    December 1, 2015

    Very helpful info

  • david lopez
    December 2, 2015

    I LOVE ALL THE CONTEST OF UR EXPLANATION. NEVER STOP! THANK U.

  • Iron Damage
    December 20, 2015

    Very well put together video you have done. Just wanted to point out a few
    things though. 12:08 you mentioned for salt intake of 2000 grams daily, I
    believe you meant 2000 milligrams. Other than that, I am not sure if
    guidelines still recommend ACE+ARB combos anymore. Very educational and
    informative.

  • 高木真斗
    January 11, 2016

    しね

    • EmpoweRN
      January 11, 2016

      +水口翔太 🙂

  • Vicki Ryan
    January 12, 2016

    From a Pharmacy student in Ireland, Thank you 🙂 I love how you read out
    the bullet points and put in illustrations/videos. Keep them coming!

  • boshra night
    January 21, 2016

    iam vet student and this viedo help me thanks for you

  • boshra night
    January 21, 2016

    iam vet student and this viedo help me thanks for you

  • boshra night
    January 21, 2016

    iam vet student and this viedo help me thanks for you

  • boshra night
    January 21, 2016

    iam vet student and this viedo help me thanks ❤

  • Abasaranai BBS
    February 6, 2016

    Many thanks and love this video

    • EmpoweRN
      February 11, 2016

      +Abasaranai BBS
      You’re welcome!
      Thanks for letting me know you love the video.
      I appreciate it a lot.
      -xoxo

  • Roilo Hernandez
    February 13, 2016

    it really helps. ?
    but can i just suggest one thing? if u can also give rationale to all of
    those sign and symptoms of each diseases. thank you!

  • doogieRN1
    March 15, 2016

    Thank you so much Carolyn for this video. I know as nurses we must always
    review to keep up with the changes in medicine, but with life it can be soo
    hectic!! I would like to know what do you do to help you keep up with CEU’s
    and work, and family responsibilities. I know balance is key, but I am
    toppling over!

  • Joan Cherilien
    April 2, 2016

    I love this videos very informative put I wish they had more nursing care.
    What does the nurse due for someone with CHF

  • cript crum
    April 6, 2016

    thx alot nextime think about us on r tablets I can’t click a link on the
    vid put it n the disctitipion

  • Kara Jane
    May 15, 2016

    I love all of your videos. You do such an amazing job at simplifying
    complicated subjects. Would you consider doing a video on CABG surgery? I’m
    working on a Cardiology unit as a student nurse and I see a lot of these.
    Thank you <3

  • PF Campos
    June 4, 2016

    Thanks so much for your video, I am not a nurse but my father died of
    congestive heart failure and I have recently been having issues that might
    indicate heart issues. I couldn’t find any info that really explained this
    condition until I came upon your video. keep up the good work!

  • Rachelle Smith
    June 29, 2016

    Nicely done! Thanks.

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