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Be the Best Nurse: Nursing Interventions for Heart Failure

Be the Best Nurse: Nursing Interventions for Heart Failure

August 3, 2016 @ 4:28 pm
by Heart News 247

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Be The Best Nurse: Nursing Interventions For Heart Failure

Author is Registered Nurse Jonathan Small

Be The Best Nurse: Nursing Interventions For Heart Failure

www.nclexpreceptor.com

Be The Best Nurse: Nursing Interventions For Heart Failure

By Mayo Clinic Staff
Appointments & care

Be The Best Nurse: Nursing Interventions For Heart Failure

At Mayo Clinic, we take the time to listen, to find answers and to provide you the best care.
Learn more. Request an appointment.

Be The Best Nurse: Nursing Interventions For Heart Failure

Mayo Clinic in Minnesota has been recognized as one of the top Cardiology & Heart Surgery hospitals in the nation for 2014-2015 by U.S. News & World Report.
Learn more about this top honor
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Be The Best Nurse: Nursing Interventions For Heart Failure

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Heart failure, sometimes known as congestive heart failure (CHF), occurs when your heart muscle doesn't pump blood as well as it should. Conditions such as narrowed arteries in your heart (coronary artery disease) or high blood pressure gradually leave your heart too weak or stiff to fill and pump efficiently.

Not all conditions that lead to heart failure can be reversed, but treatments can improve the signs and symptoms of heart failure and help you live longer. Lifestyle changes, such as exercising, reducing salt in your diet, managing stress and especially losing weight, can improve your quality of life.

The best way to prevent heart failure is to control conditions that cause heart failure, such as coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, diabetes or obesity.

Heart failure also known as congestive heart failure (CHF) happens when your heart does not pump blood as well as it should. Heart failure can involve the left side, right side or both sides of your heart. Typically, heart failure begins with the left side — specifically the left ventricle, your heart's main pumping chamber.
Causes: Heart failure can be caused by a heart attack, coronary artery disease, hypertension, heart defects, or damage to heart muscle.
Risk Factors: People are more likely to develop heart failure if they have high blood pressure, a heart attack, diabetes, sleep apnea, congenital heart defects, alcoholic, or have an irregular heartbeat.
Test: Heart failure is diagnosed using blood test such as N-Terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). A chest X-ray can also help to see the condition of your heart and lungs. Electrocardiogram (ECG) records the electrical activity of your heart and can detect irregular heart rhythms. Determining ejection fraction is important to determine how well the heart is pumping.
Signs and Symptoms: People affected by heart failure my experience shortness of breath, swelling in feet, persistent cough or wheezing, sudden weight gain from fluid, elevated blood pressure and chest pain.
Treatment: Heart failure is a chronic disease and needs lifelong management. The treatment of heart failure usually involves medications and lifestyle changes.
Medications: Heart failure is commonly treated with medications such as Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, Angiotensin II receptor blockers, Beta blockers, and Diuretics.
Lifestyle changes: Making healthy lifestyle changes can help relieve signs and symptoms of heart failure. People with heart failure should stop smoking, weigh yourself daily, restrict salt in your diet, maintain a health weight, limit fats and cholesterol, reduce alcohol and fluids, and become more active.

Be the Best Nurse: Nursing Interventions for Heart Failure

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Get NCLEX and Nursing tips @ https://www.facebook.com/nclex.preceptor and http://www.pinterest.com/nclexp/

Author is Registered Nurse Jonathan Small

www.nclexpreceptor.com

By Mayo Clinic Staff
Appointments & care

At Mayo Clinic, we take the time to listen, to find answers and to provide you the best care.
Learn more. Request an appointment.

Mayo Clinic in Minnesota has been recognized as one of the top Cardiology & Heart Surgery hospitals in the nation for 2014-2015 by U.S. News & World Report.
Learn more about this top honor
Heart-Healthy Living

Subscribe to our Heart-Healthy Living e-newsletter to stay up to date on heart-health topics.
Sign up now

Heart failure, sometimes known as congestive heart failure (CHF), occurs when your heart muscle doesn't pump blood as well as it should. Conditions such as narrowed arteries in your heart (coronary artery disease) or high blood pressure gradually leave your heart too weak or stiff to fill and pump efficiently.

Not all conditions that lead to heart failure can be reversed, but treatments can improve the signs and symptoms of heart failure and help you live longer. Lifestyle changes, such as exercising, reducing salt in your diet, managing stress and especially losing weight, can improve your quality of life.

The best way to prevent heart failure is to control conditions that cause heart failure, such as coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, diabetes or obesity.

Heart failure also known as congestive heart failure (CHF) happens when your heart does not pump blood as well as it should. Heart failure can involve the left side, right side or both sides of your heart. Typically, heart failure begins with the left side — specifically the left ventricle, your heart's main pumping chamber.
Causes: Heart failure can be caused by a heart attack, coronary artery disease, hypertension, heart defects, or damage to heart muscle.
Risk Factors: People are more likely to develop heart failure if they have high blood pressure, a heart attack, diabetes, sleep apnea, congenital heart defects, alcoholic, or have an irregular heartbeat.
Test: Heart failure is diagnosed using blood test such as N-Terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). A chest X-ray can also help to see the condition of your heart and lungs. Electrocardiogram (ECG) records the electrical activity of your heart and can detect irregular heart rhythms. Determining ejection fraction is important to determine how well the heart is pumping.
Signs and Symptoms: People affected by heart failure my experience shortness of breath, swelling in feet, persistent cough or wheezing, sudden weight gain from fluid, elevated blood pressure and chest pain.
Treatment: Heart failure is a chronic disease and needs lifelong management. The treatment of heart failure usually involves medications and lifestyle changes.
Medications: Heart failure is commonly treated with medications such as Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, Angiotensin II receptor blockers, Beta blockers, and Diuretics.
Lifestyle changes: Making healthy lifestyle changes can help relieve signs and symptoms of heart failure. People with heart failure should stop smoking, weigh yourself daily, restrict salt in your diet, maintain a health weight, limit fats and cholesterol, reduce alcohol and fluids, and become more active.

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